Message from the Unseen World
United Visual Artists, Futurity, Nick Drake
Paul Felton:

The underside of Bishop’s Bridge Road, near Paddington, hosts a moving tribute to pioneering mathematician, code-breaker and father of computer science — Alan Turing, entitled Message from the Unseen World. The text is a poem by poet and playwright Nick Drake which sees Turing speaking posthumously about his life, complete with coded versions of extracts from Turing’s text that disintegrate and fracture as new words replace the previous ones.

The Emperor’s Quest – Chinese Garden App
The Nest, a part of Frost*collective
Vince Frost:

The App created by The Nest, for Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority takes families on a fascinating journey into the ancient world of Chinese Zodiac, whilst roaming the Chinese garden in Darling Harbour – Sydney.

Material Design: Making Color Easy
Buck / Google Design
Jeffrey Iacoboni:

Even something like color palette guidelines don’t have to be static. This animation not only explains the dynamics of choosing colors for Google products, but does in an easily digestible and enjoyable way. What designer doesn’t love watching moving fields of color?

Inflatable Bag Monsters
Joshua Allen Harris
Rob Duncan:

Great Idea by New York artist Joshua Allen Harris. Creatures constructed from trash bags come to life using the air flowing around and out of the New York Subway stations.

Farewell
Stockholm Design Lab
Rob Duncan:

In Europe alone, 35 billion kilometers are driven by delivery trucks that are completely empty. Why? Legacy software systems have created a situation where crucial data isn’t shared, and hence important decisions are based on poor information. Farewell, designed by Stockholm Design Lab, is a great example of design making a difference. A revolutionary logistics application, in one common language, with all important information being shared in real time. View case study here.

Halt and Catch Fire Credits
Patrick Claire, Antibody
Marc Catala:

We follow an electronic impulse in a super augmented image, all the way from the guts of the machine to the main chip that starts it all, and see the initial blipping light of the computer. Striking, visual, meaningful, relevant. From the guy who did the first True Detective credits. Bravo.