Posters

The art of copywriting

Mytton Williams

Mytton Williams have produced a beautiful and clever set of posters for Ink Copywriters. Using Indian ink and a variety of tools they submerged, brushed, splattered, absorbed and dragged ink across the canvas, illustrating a selection of words through mark making that express a few of the client’s many different tones of voice.

Moniker’s Bridge Poster Series links business diagram language with abstract graphic purism in an effortless and natural manner. It is easier said than done: whilst both languages can visually connect, it is still testing to do so in a way that looks fresh and elegant. It demands not getting too obvious, too abstract or too pretentious. This graceful approach allows for form and color to respond to content, and even generate new meaning through the image. Inspiring work.

SVA Subway Posters

Visual Arts Press

The School of Visual Arts (SVA) in New York releases a subway advertisement every year. Over the 70 year history of the school it’s internal studio The Visual Arts Press has collaborated with many celebrated designers (Paula Scher, Louise Fili, Milton Glaser, George Tscherny; to name a few) to create these posters. Each poster uniquely sells the idea of fostering creativity in a way that can withstand the visual clutter of New York’s subway. More posters can be seen here.

Dn&Co have designed a poster titled ‘Lungs of London’. The poster depicts the city’s green spaces screen-printed in fluorescent ink and the Thames picked out in varnish. First attributed to William Pitt the Elder, the phrase is often used to defend these life-giving parks and squares against the pressures of urban development. A simple, beautifully crafted green statement. Thanks to Astrid Stavro for the tip.

Me We

Design by Design Bridge in collaboration with The Counter Press

A collaborative solution for a collaborative problem. Design Bridge asked The Counter Press to work with them on a book for staff, Me/We explains what they stand for from both agency and individual point of view: read from one end gives the ‘Me’ story, while flipping the book over and reading from the other side gives the ‘We’ story.